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Older Adult Supports & Services

    Results: 16

  • Aging and Disability Resource Centers (38)
    LH-0350

    Aging and Disability Resource Centers

    LH-0350

    Programs that create a single, coordinated system of information and access for older adults and people with disabilities who are seeking long term support to minimize confusion, enhance individual choice, and support informed decision-making. ADRC centers serve as a single point of entry to public long term support programs and services. They offer information and counseling regarding available long term support options; assist individuals in determining their eligibility for public long term support programs and benefits including level of care determinations for Medicaid nursing facility and home and community-based service waiver programs; provide short-term case management to stabilize long term supports for individuals and their families in times of immediate need; help people plan for their future long term support needs; and provide information about and referral to other programs and benefits (such as health promotion and disease prevention, transportation services, housing and income support programs) that help people remain in the community.
  • Area Agencies on Aging (28)
    TD-1100.6500-050

    Area Agencies on Aging

    TD-1100.6500-050

    Substate organizations authorized under the Older Americans Act of 1965 to develop a comprehensive, coordinated system of community-based services for older adults within their planning and service area. State Units on Aging designate, provide federal and state funding, and monitor operations of AAAs. Eight states and the District of Columbia do not have AAAs and, therefore, serve the roles of both state and area agency. AAA's responsibilities include planning; development of local funding resources; and contracting with local service provider organizations to provide authorized services which include information and referral/assistance, outreach, case/care management, escort, transportation, homemaker/chore, personal care, home repair and rehabilitation, home delivered meals, congregate meals, adult day care, elder abuse prevention, nursing home ombudsman, legal assistance, employment and training, health promotion and disease prevention and senior centers as well as services that support caregivers including respite care, counseling and education programs. AAAs may provide a number of other services in situations where local service provider options are limited.
  • Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites (347)
    BD-5000.1500

    Congregate Meals/Nutrition Sites

    BD-5000.1500

    Programs that provide hot meals on a regular basis primarily for older adults who may be at risk for nutritional deficits and social isolation without assistance. Congregate meals are often combined with recreational, educational and social activities, and programs may include access to health services and/or information. Some programs are also open to caregivers, spouses and/or adults with disabilities.
  • Elder Abuse Prevention (2)
    FN-1500.1900-180

    Elder Abuse Prevention

    FN-1500.1900-180

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of financial, emotional, physical and sexual abuse or intimidation of elderly people and dependent adults by members of their families or other caregivers through a variety of educational interventions which are aimed at the likely victims of abuse, potential perpetrators, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Geriatric Psychiatric Inpatient Units (25)
    RM-3300.6600-250

    Geriatric Psychiatric Inpatient Units

    RM-3300.6600-250

    Programs offered in special units of general acute care hospitals that provide diagnostic and treatment services for older adults who have acute psychiatric disorders which may be complicated by medical or neurological problems and who require hospitalization for maximum benefit. Services may include a comprehensive evaluation; 24-hour care in a supportive, therapeutic environment; activities compatible with their current abilities; counseling for the patient and family; adjunctive therapies as needed; medication, if required; and an aftercare program following discharge. Locked facilities may be available for patients with serious behavior management problems.
  • Home Delivered Meals (29)
    BD-5000.3500

    Home Delivered Meals

    BD-5000.3500

    Programs that prepare and regularly deliver meals to older adults, people with disabilities and others who have difficulties shopping and/or preparing food for themselves or traveling to a site where a meal is being served.
  • In Home Assistance (27)
    PH-3300

    In Home Assistance

    PH-3300

    Programs that provide assistance in performing routine household, yard and personal care activities for older adults, people with disabilities, eligible low income people, families whose normal routines have been disrupted by an emergency or others who need or want these services. The objective of in-home assistance is to help the recipient sustain independent living in a clean, safe and healthy home environment.
  • Long Term Care Options Counseling (27)
    LH-4600

    Long Term Care Options Counseling

    LH-4600

    Programs that offer an interactive decision support process that helps individuals in need of long term care and their families understand their strengths, needs, preferences and unique circumstances and weigh the pros and cons of available alternatives. The consultation includes a discussion of the factors to consider when making long term care decisions, information about the range of long term care support options available in their community (such as personal care, transportation and medication management) and resources that can help them pay for services. The program also provides decision support to help identify next steps in the process and help in connecting with services, if needed. The service is generally available to older adults and adults of any age who have a disability; can be of benefit to people using their own resources to pay for services; and may be provided over the telephone or in person (at home, at an agency, in a hospital, at a rehabilitation or nursing facility or in another setting of the person's choosing). The objective of the program is to allow people to live as independently as possible in the setting of their choice.
  • Medicare (4)
    NS-8000.5000

    Medicare

    NS-8000.5000

    A federally funded health insurance program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for people age 65 and older; for individuals with disabilities younger than age 65 who have received or been determined eligible for Social Security Disability benefits for at least 24 consecutive months; and for insured workers and their dependents who have end stage renal disease and need dialysis or a kidney transplant. As with ESRD, the 24-month waiting period is waived for disability beneficiaries diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease). Premiums, deductibles and co-payments or out-of-pocket costs apply to Medicare coverage for most people. Special programs that assist with paying some or all of these costs are available for low income individuals who qualify. Medicare has four parts, but not every Medicare beneficiary has every part. Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers inpatient hospital stays, care in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care and home health care that meets the program eligibility criteria. Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers services from doctors and other health care providers, outpatient care, home health care, durable medical equipment, preventive services and more. Together, Medicare Part A and Part B are called Original Medicare. Medicare Part C enables private insurance companies to offer Medicare Advantage (MA) Plans under contract with CMS that provide all Part A and Part B benefits to plan enrollees. Medicare Advantage Plans include Health Maintenance Organizations, Preferred Provider Organizations, Private Fee-for-Service Plans, Special Needs Plans and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans. Some plans offer extra benefits and services that aren't covered by Original Medicare, sometimes for an extra cost; and most (but not all) include Medicare prescription drug coverage. Medicare Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage) is an optional benefit that helps beneficiaries cover the cost of prescription drugs. The plans are offered by insurance companies and other private companies approved by Medicare and add prescription drug coverage to Original Medicare, some Medicare Private-Fee-for-Service Plans and Medicare Medical Savings Account Plans.
  • Medicare Advantage Plan Enrollment (1)
    NS-8000.5000-480

    Medicare Advantage Plan Enrollment

    NS-8000.5000-480

    Sponsors of Medicare Advantage (MA) health care plans approved by Medicare that accept applications for enrollment in one of the Medicare Advantage options that offer Part A (hospital) and Part B (medical) coverage. Prescription drug coverage may also be included. Many MA Plans offer extra benefits (e.g., vision coverage, dental coverage, hearing care, wellness services and nurse line support) and may offer lower co-payments than Original Medicare. However, MA plans may require participants to use physicians, hospitals and other providers that are part of the plan's provider network. Medicare Advantage Plans include: Medicare Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plans; Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Plans; Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) Plans; Medicare Special Needs Plans (SNP); and Medicare Savings Account Plans (MSA Plans). To join a MA Plan, an individual must be enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B. In addition to paying the monthly Part B premium required by Medicare, MA Plans may require a monthly premium for the extra benefits provided by the Plan. Information about Medicare Advantage plans is available in the "Welcome to Medicare" handbook people receive when they enroll, by calling 1-800-MEDICARE or by using the Plan Finder on the Medicare website.
  • Outreach Programs for Older Adults (8)
    TJ-6500.6300 * YB-8000

    Outreach Programs for Older Adults

    TJ-6500.6300 * YB-8000

    Organizations that make an effort to increase the availability and utilization of community services by specific target populations by providing direct services for targeted individuals in their homes or other convenient locations or by making special efforts to ensure that a particular group is aware of available services and encouraged to participate. Included are programs that do outreach regarding their own services as well as those which encourage a target population to use a wide variety of services. * Individuals who are age 50, 55, 60, 62 or 65 or older depending on the minimum age for qualifying as an older adult which varies by program.
  • PACE Programs (8)
    NL-5000.6800

    PACE Programs

    NL-5000.6800

    A capitated benefit authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) that features a comprehensive service delivery system and integrated Medicare and Medicaid financing. For most participants, the comprehensive service package permits them to continue living at home while receiving services rather than being institutionalized. Capitated financing allows providers to deliver all services participants need rather than being limited to those reimbursable under the Medicare and Medicaid fee-for-service systems. The BBA established the PACE model of care as a permanent entity within the Medicare program and enables States to provide PACE services to Medicaid beneficiaries as a State option. The State plan must include PACE as an optional Medicaid benefit before it can enter into program agreements with PACE providers. Participants must be at least 55 years of age, live in the PACE service area, and be certified as eligible for nursing home care by the appropriate State agency. The PACE program becomes the sole source of services for Medicare and Medicaid eligible enrollees. PACE programs provide social and medical services primarily in an adult day health center, supplemented by in-home and referral services in accordance with the participant's needs. The care is overseen by an interdisciplinary team, consisting of professional and paraprofessional staff.
  • Personal Care (25)
    PH-3300.6500

    Personal Care

    PH-3300.6500

    Programs that offer the services of paraprofessional aides who provide assistance with personal hygiene (bathing, grooming and mouth care), clothing care, ambulation, seating, toileting, housekeeping (changing bed linens or other chores that are essential to the individual's health and comfort), food preparation and nutritional and environmental support for recently discharged hospital patients, elderly people and people with disabilities in their own homes or other settings. Personal care may also include supervision which involves cueing, reminding, prompting or directing daily activities, as needed, but does not include medical services.
  • Senior Centers (348)
    TC-5500.8000

    Senior Centers

    TC-5500.8000

    Multipurpose centers that serve as focal points for older adults in the community and which offer, at a single location, a wide variety of services and activities that are needed by and of interest to this population.
  • Senior Ride Programs (34)
    BT-4500.6500-800

    Senior Ride Programs

    BT-4500.6500-800

    Programs that provide door-to-door (or curb-to-curb) transportation for purposes of medical appointments, shopping, banking, social events, and other similar activities for older adults who need special accommodations and are unable to utilize other available means of transportation.
  • Specialized Information and Referral for Older Adults (30)
    TJ-3000.8000 * YB-8000

    Specialized Information and Referral for Older Adults

    TJ-3000.8000 * YB-8000

    Programs that maintain information about community resources that are appropriate for a specific target group or human services sector (for example, youth programs or addiction services) and which link individuals who are in need of specialized services with appropriate resources and/or which provide information about community agencies and organizations that offer specialized services.

    Individuals who are age 50, 55, 60, 62 or 65 or older depending on the minimum age for qualifying as an older adult which varies by program.